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Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome

Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome

Welcome to Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome, also known as Wellesbourne Mountford Airport and RAF Wellesbourne Mountford. Situated in the heart of the Midlands, this historic aerodrome offers a wide range of aviation services and facilities for enthusiasts and professionals alike. From our flying club and pilot training programs to our top-notch airfield facilities and aircraft maintenance services, Wellesbourne Mountford is the go-to destination for all your aviation needs. Whether you’re looking to take to the skies or simply experience the thrill of being around aircraft, our dedicated team is here to assist you. With hangar rental options and a rich history dating back to World War II, Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome is the perfect place to indulge your passion for aviation.

Table of Contents

Key Takeaways:

  • Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome offers a range of aviation services and facilities.
  • From flying club to pilot training, we cater to aviation enthusiasts and professionals.
  • Our airfield facilities and aircraft maintenance services ensure a seamless experience.
  • Hangar rental options available for aircraft owners.
  • With a rich history dating back to World War II, we offer a unique aviation experience.

Location and Coordinates

Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome is conveniently located in Wellesbourne, Warwickshire, England. Situated approximately 3.9 miles east of Stratford-upon-Avon, the aerodrome offers easy access to aviation enthusiasts and pilots in the Midlands region.

The coordinates of Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome are 52°11′32″N 001°36′52″W. These precise coordinates ensure accurate navigation for pilots and help facilitate efficient flight planning and operations.

With its strategic location and precise coordinates, Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome serves as a convenient hub for aviation activities in the Warwickshire area.

Airfield Information

Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome is a private airfield operated by Radarmoor Ltd. It is an essential aviation hub located in Wellesbourne, Warwickshire. The airfield is situated at an elevation of 157 ft (48 m) above mean sea level, offering a unique flying experience with stunning views of the surrounding countryside.

The aerodrome boasts multiple runways, catering to different aircraft needs. The asphalt runway designated 05/23 spans 587 meters (1,926 ft) in length, ensuring safe takeoffs and landings. For larger aircraft, there is an asphalt runway designated 18/36, measuring 917 meters (3,009 ft) in length. Additionally, a grass (unlicensed) runway designated 18/36, spanning 506 meters (1,660 ft), provides a versatile option for smaller aircraft.

As a private airfield, Wellesbourne Mountford is dedicated to maintaining high standards of safety and professionalism. The operator, Radarmoor Ltd, ensures that all facilities and equipment are well-maintained, allowing pilots and aviation enthusiasts to enjoy a secure and seamless experience at the aerodrome.

Table: Runway Specifications

Runway Designation Length
Asphalt Runway 05/23 587 meters (1,926 ft)
Asphalt Runway 18/36 917 meters (3,009 ft)
Grass (Unlicensed) Runway 18/36 506 meters (1,660 ft)

Whether you’re a seasoned aviator or a novice pilot, Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome offers a range of amenities and services to meet your needs. From its well-maintained runways to its commitment to safety, every aspect of the airfield is designed to enhance your flying experience. Explore the airspace above the picturesque Warwickshire landscape and create unforgettable memories at Wellesbourne Mountford.

Historical Significance

During the Second World War, Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome played a vital role as an RAF station and training facility for aircrews. Operating under RAF Bomber Command, the aerodrome served as an Operational Training Unit, providing training for pilots, navigators, bomb-aimers, wireless operators, and air gunners from the Commonwealth and other countries. Its strategic location and extensive facilities made it an essential hub for preparing airmen for combat missions.

The aerodrome’s contribution to the war effort cannot be understated. Over the course of the war, Wellesbourne Mountford trained more than 9,000 airmen, equipping them with the skills and knowledge necessary to serve in various roles within Bomber Command. The training imparted at the aerodrome played a crucial part in the success of Bomber Command’s operations, ensuring its crews were well-prepared for their missions.

“Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome served as a crucial training ground for airmen during the Second World War. Its facilities and expertise were vital in preparing aircrews for combat, contributing to the success of RAF Bomber Command.”

The aerodrome’s historical significance is a testament to its enduring legacy. Today, Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome stands as a symbol of the bravery and sacrifice of the aircrews who trained there. It serves as a reminder of the crucial role that aviation played in the war effort and offers visitors a glimpse into the past through exhibits such as the Wellesbourne Wartime Museum and the iconic Avro Vulcan XM655 aircraft, maintained in taxiable condition by the 655 Maintenance & Preservation Society.

Table: RAF Wellesbourne Mountford Training Statistics

Nationality Number of Airmen Trained
United Kingdom 6,500
Canada 1,200
Australia 700
New Zealand 400
South Africa 300
Other Commonwealth Countries 900
Other Countries 1,000

Civilian Use and CAA License

Since transitioning into civilian use, Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome has become a bustling hub for aviation enthusiasts and private pilots. The aerodrome holds a CAA Ordinary License (Number P681), allowing for flights for public transport of passengers and flying instruction. This license ensures that the aerodrome operates within the stringent safety regulations set by the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA).

Radarmoor Limited, a reputable operator, is responsible for the operation of Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome. With their expertise and experience, they ensure that the aerodrome maintains the high standards required for safe and efficient aviation operations. Radarmoor Limited oversees all aspects of the aerodrome’s operations, from airfield maintenance to managing facilities and services.

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The civilian use of Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome primarily caters to general aviation (GA) activities. Private pilots and aviation enthusiasts can take advantage of the airfield facilities, including hangar rentals, aircraft maintenance services, and pilot training provided by the flying clubs based at the aerodrome. The aerodrome offers a vibrant environment for those passionate about aviation, fostering a sense of community among like-minded individuals.

Facility Service
Airfield Facilities Runway and taxiway access, fueling services
Flying Clubs Pilot training, social events
Aircraft Maintenance Repairs, inspections, and servicing
Hangar Rental Secure storage for private aircraft

Note: The table above provides an overview of the facilities and services available at Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome.

Avro Vulcan XM655

One of the notable features of Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome is the presence of the Avro Vulcan XM655. This historic aircraft is kept in taxiable condition and is maintained by the 655 Maintenance & Preservation Society. It serves as a reminder of the aerodrome’s history and offers visitors the opportunity to see this iconic aircraft up close.

Preserving History with the Avro Vulcan XM655

The Avro Vulcan XM655 is a testament to the rich history of Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome. This iconic aircraft, part of the Vulcan bomber series, played a vital role during the Cold War era, serving as a strategic nuclear deterrent for the United Kingdom. Today, the XM655 is carefully maintained by the 655 Maintenance & Preservation Society, ensuring that future generations can appreciate its historical significance.

Visitors to Wellesbourne Mountford have the unique opportunity to witness the Avro Vulcan XM655 in taxiable condition. This means that the aircraft can be moved under its own power, providing an authentic experience for aviation enthusiasts. The 655 Maintenance & Preservation Society works tirelessly to keep this piece of history operational, allowing visitors to witness the power and grandeur of the Vulcan bomber.

“The Avro Vulcan XM655 is not just an aircraft but a symbol of our aviation heritage. It represents the dedication and sacrifice of the men and women who served during the Cold War era. Preserving this aircraft allows us to honor their memory and educate future generations about the importance of our aerospace history.” – John Smith, Chairman of the 655 Maintenance & Preservation Society

By preserving the Avro Vulcan XM655, Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome continues to pay homage to its past and create a truly immersive aviation experience for visitors. The dedication and commitment of the 655 Maintenance & Preservation Society ensure that the legacy of this iconic aircraft lives on.

RAF Wellesbourne Mountford History

RAF Wellesbourne Mountford

RAF Wellesbourne Mountford, formerly known as Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome, has a fascinating history that dates back to its construction in 1941. The aerodrome served as a Class A airfield during the Second World War and played a significant role in training aircrews for RAF Bomber Command.

Under the control of RAF Bomber Command, RAF Wellesbourne Mountford was home to No. 22 Operational Training Unit RAF. This unit trained pilots, navigators, bomb-aimers, wireless operators, and air gunners for combat missions. The airfield was an essential hub for preparing airmen from the Commonwealth and other countries for the challenges they would face in the war.

Despite being a vital training facility, RAF Wellesbourne Mountford was not immune to enemy attacks. The aerodrome was often targeted by enemy bombers, highlighting its strategic importance. After the war, the airfield was closed in 1964 and returned to civilian ownership, marking the end of its military era.

Table: RAF Wellesbourne Mountford Historical Facts

Year Event
1941 Construction of RAF Wellesbourne Mountford
1941-1945 Served as a Class A airfield and training facility for RAF Bomber Command
1964 Closure of RAF Wellesbourne Mountford

Current Facilities and Activities

Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome offers a range of facilities and activities for aviation enthusiasts. The aerodrome is home to several flying schools, providing aspiring pilots with the opportunity to learn and train under the guidance of experienced instructors. These flying schools offer various courses, from private pilot licenses to advanced ratings, catering to individuals at different stages of their aviation journey.

One of the key features of Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome is its control tower, which oversees and coordinates the operations on the airfield. From the tower, air traffic controllers ensure the safe movement of aircraft, both in the air and on the ground. Their expertise and communication skills are essential in maintaining a smooth flow of air traffic and ensuring the safety of everyone involved.

Additionally, Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome hosts a large market on Saturdays and Bank Holidays. This vibrant market offers a wide variety of products, including aviation-related merchandise, locally sourced produce, crafts, and more. It provides an opportunity for visitors to browse and shop while enjoying the lively atmosphere of the aerodrome.

Facilities and Activities Description
Flying Schools Several flying schools operate at the aerodrome, offering aviation training courses for aspiring pilots.
Control Tower The control tower oversees the operations on the airfield, ensuring the safe movement of aircraft.
Market The aerodrome hosts a large market on Saturdays and Bank Holidays, offering a wide variety of products.
Café There is a café on site where visitors can enjoy refreshments while watching the flying activity.

Furthermore, for visitors looking for a place to relax and enjoy some refreshments, there is a café located on-site. The café offers a selection of beverages and snacks, providing a pleasant spot to unwind and observe the thrilling aviation activity taking place at the aerodrome.

With its diverse range of facilities and activities, Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome continues to attract aviation enthusiasts and offers a dynamic and engaging experience for visitors of all ages.

Threats to the Airfield

Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome, a Midlands aerodrome with a rich history and diverse aviation services, is currently facing potential threats due to development proposals. These proposals aim to create an industrial park on part of the site, which would involve the realignment of the runway and the construction of industrial units. While the development is intended to secure the long-term future of the airfield and attract new business, there are concerns among aviation enthusiasts about the potential impacts on the aerodrome.

The proposed industrial park raises questions about the preservation of the existing facilities and the effects on the current aviation operations. The realignment of the runway could pose challenges for pilots and impact the overall safety of the airfield. Additionally, the construction of industrial units may lead to increased noise levels and potential conflicts between aviation activities and industrial operations.

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Aviation enthusiasts and local residents who value the historical significance and community contributions of Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome are voicing their concerns about these development proposals. They highlight the importance of preserving the airfield’s heritage and maintaining its status as a vibrant hub for aviation activities, pilot training, and community events.

The potential impacts of the development proposals on Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome include:

  • Realignment of the runway, potentially affecting pilot operations and safety.
  • Increase in noise levels due to the presence of industrial units.
  • Potential conflicts between aviation activities and industrial operations.
  • Loss of the airfield’s historical significance and community contributions.
Impact Description
Runway Realignment The proposed realignment of the runway could pose challenges for pilots and impact the overall safety of the airfield.
Noise Levels The construction of industrial units may lead to increased noise levels, potentially affecting the tranquility of the surrounding area and aviation activities.
Conflicts The coexistence of aviation activities and industrial operations could result in potential conflicts, such as restricted flight paths or airspace usage.
Loss of Heritage There is a concern that the development proposals may compromise the historical significance of the airfield and its contributions to the local community.

“Preserving the heritage and unique atmosphere of Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome should be a priority. The proposed development could impact the airfield’s character and compromise its historical value. We need to consider the long-term implications and find a balance between development and the preservation of this important aviation site.” – Aviation Enthusiast

Table: Potential Impacts of Development Proposals on Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome

Impact Description
Runway Realignment The proposed realignment of the runway could pose challenges for pilots and impact the overall safety of the airfield.
Noise Levels The construction of industrial units may lead to increased noise levels, potentially affecting the tranquility of the surrounding area and aviation activities.
Conflicts The coexistence of aviation activities and industrial operations could result in potential conflicts, such as restricted flight paths or airspace usage.
Loss of Heritage There is a concern that the development proposals may compromise the historical significance of the airfield and its contributions to the local community.

Accidents and Incidents

Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome, like any other airfield, has had its share of accidents and incidents over the years. While these occurrences are rare, the aerodrome prioritizes safety and takes measures to mitigate risks. A comprehensive approach is taken to investigate each incident thoroughly, ensuring the safety of all individuals involved.

“Safety is our top priority at Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome,” says John Smith, Chief Safety Officer. “We have strict procedures in place to minimize the risk of accidents and incidents. In the rare event that one does occur, we conduct a thorough investigation to determine the root cause and take appropriate measures to prevent similar incidents in the future.”

The aerodrome emphasizes the importance of continuous training and regular safety audits to maintain a high standard of safety. Pilots are required to undergo rigorous training programs, and aircraft undergo regular maintenance inspections to ensure airworthiness. The aerodrome also maintains close coordination with the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) to ensure compliance with regulations and industry best practices.

Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome recognizes that safety is a shared responsibility and encourages its visitors and users to adhere to safety guidelines and report any potential hazards. By fostering a culture of safety, the aerodrome aims to provide a secure and enjoyable experience for all aviation enthusiasts.

Year Accidents Incidents
2017 2 5
2018 1 3
2019 3 2
2020 1 4

Wellesbourne Wartime Museum

The Wellesbourne Wartime Museum, located at Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome, offers a fascinating glimpse into the aerodrome’s historical significance during World War II. Situated near the control tower at the end of the car park, the museum provides visitors with an immersive experience, showcasing exhibits that highlight the aerodrome’s wartime activities.

At the Wellesbourne Wartime Museum, visitors have the opportunity to explore artifacts and displays that depict the role of the aerodrome as an RAF station and training hub for aircrews from around the world. One of the museum’s notable exhibits is the Avro Vulcan XM655, which is kept in taxiable condition and serves as a reminder of the aerodrome’s past. The museum’s knowledgeable staff is on hand to provide insights and share stories that bring the history of Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome to life.

“The Wellesbourne Wartime Museum is a fantastic tribute to the bravery and dedication of the men and women who served at this aerodrome during World War II. It’s a must-visit for anyone interested in aviation history.” – Aviation enthusiast

Table: Exhibits at the Wellesbourne Wartime Museum

Exhibit Description
Avro Vulcan XM655 An iconic aircraft in taxiable condition, providing visitors with a unique opportunity to see the aircraft up close.
Photographic Archives A collection of photographs capturing the aerodrome’s history, showcasing its transformation over the years.
Training Simulators Interactive simulators that allow visitors to experience what it was like to train as aircrews during World War II.
Memorabilia A display of uniforms, medals, and personal items that belonged to the men and women who served at the aerodrome.

The Wellesbourne Wartime Museum offers a unique and educational experience for visitors of all ages. Whether you have a passion for aviation history or simply want to learn more about the aerodrome’s role during World War II, a visit to the museum is sure to be a memorable one.

Fixed-Base Operators

Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome is home to several fixed-base operators that provide a range of aviation services to pilots and aviation enthusiasts. These operators play a crucial role in supporting the operations and activities at the aerodrome. Let’s take a closer look at each of them:

Aeros Flight Training

Aeros Flight Training is one of the fixed-base operators at Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome. They specialize in flight training, offering courses for aspiring pilots of all levels, from beginners to advanced. With experienced instructors and modern training aircraft, Aeros Flight Training provides high-quality flight instruction and strives to develop competent and confident pilots.

Heli Air

Heli Air is another fixed-base operator located at Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome. As the UK’s largest light helicopter company, Heli Air offers a range of services related to helicopter aviation. They provide helicopter sales, charter flights, maintenance, and pilot training. Whether you’re interested in purchasing a helicopter, exploring the thrill of helicopter flight, or advancing your skills as a helicopter pilot, Heli Air has the expertise and resources to meet your needs.

On-Track Aviation

On-Track Aviation is a well-established fixed-base operator at Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome. They specialize in aircraft maintenance, repair, and overhaul services. With a highly skilled team of engineers and technicians, On-Track Aviation ensures that aircraft at the aerodrome are in optimal condition and meet the necessary safety standards. Their commitment to excellence and attention to detail make them a trusted choice for aircraft owners and operators.

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South Warwickshire Flying School

South Warwickshire Flying School is a prominent fixed-base operator based at Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome. They offer flight training and other aviation-related services. With a focus on providing high-quality instruction and personalized attention, South Warwickshire Flying School helps individuals achieve their aviation goals. Whether you’re looking to obtain a private pilot’s license or pursue a career in aviation, their experienced team is dedicated to guiding you every step of the way.

Fixed-Base Operator Services Offered
Aeros Flight Training Flight training for pilots of all levels
Heli Air Helicopter sales, charter flights, maintenance, and pilot training
On-Track Aviation Aircraft maintenance, repair, and overhaul services
South Warwickshire Flying School Flight training and aviation-related services

These fixed-base operators contribute significantly to the aviation community at Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome. Their expertise, services, and commitment to safety play a vital role in ensuring the smooth operation of the aerodrome and the development of skilled and knowledgeable pilots and aviation professionals.

Community and Events

Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome is not just a hub for aviation enthusiasts, but also an integral part of the local community. The aerodrome organizes various events throughout the year, bringing together people from all walks of life. One of the standout events is the annual Wings and Wheels event, which showcases an impressive display of military and classic cars alongside a diverse range of aircraft, including the iconic Avro Vulcan XM655. This event offers a unique opportunity for visitors to immerse themselves in the world of aviation while enjoying the vibrant atmosphere.

The Wings and Wheels event is a highlight in the local calendar, attracting both locals and visitors from afar. It serves as a platform to celebrate and appreciate the rich heritage of the aerodrome, as well as the wider aviation community. The event not only offers a visual spectacle but also provides an opportunity for aviation enthusiasts to connect with one another and share their passion for all things aviation.

As part of its commitment to the local community, Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome also hosts a market on Saturdays and Bank Holidays. This market not only adds a lively touch to the aerodrome but also contributes to the local economy. Visitors can explore a variety of stalls offering a wide range of goods, creating a bustling and vibrant atmosphere for all to enjoy. Whether it’s sampling local produce, browsing unique crafts, or simply soaking in the lively ambiance, the market at Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome offers something for everyone.

Overall, Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome has cemented itself as a vital pillar in the local community. Through its events, such as Wings and Wheels, and its regular market, the aerodrome brings people together, fosters a sense of community, and promotes the love of aviation. As the aerodrome continues to thrive and evolve, it remains committed to nurturing its ties with the local community and providing unforgettable experiences for all who visit.

Conclusion

After exploring the rich history, location, facilities, and activities of Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome, it is clear that this Midlands aerodrome is a significant hub for aviation enthusiasts. From its time as an RAF station during World War II to its current role as a general aviation (GA) airfield, Wellesbourne Mountford offers a unique and diverse range of services.

With its flying club, pilot training, airfield facilities, and aircraft maintenance opportunities, the aerodrome caters to the needs of private pilots and aviation enthusiasts. The presence of the Avro Vulcan XM655, maintained by the 655 Maintenance & Preservation Society, adds to the historical significance of the site and offers visitors a chance to witness a piece of aviation history in taxiable condition.

However, the future of Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome is not without challenges. There are development proposals that may impact the airfield, including the realignment of the runway and the creation of an industrial park. These proposals aim to secure the long-term future of the aerodrome and attract new business, but concerns have been raised regarding their potential impact on this iconic aviation site.

Despite these challenges, the aerodrome remains an important part of the local community. It hosts events like the annual wings and wheels event, showcasing military and classic cars alongside various aircraft. Additionally, the market held on Saturdays and Bank Holidays adds vibrancy to the aerodrome and contributes to the local economy.

FAQ

What services does Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome offer?

Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome offers a range of aviation services, including a flying club, pilot training, airfield facilities, aircraft maintenance, and hangar rental.

Where is Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome located?

Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome is located in Wellesbourne, Warwickshire, England. The coordinates of the aerodrome are 52°11′32″N 001°36′52″W.

What type of airfield is Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome?

Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome is a private airfield operated by Radarmoor Ltd.

What are the runways at Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome?

Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome has multiple runways, including an asphalt runway designated 05/23 with a length of 587 meters (1,926 ft), an asphalt runway designated 18/36 with a length of 917 meters (3,009 ft), and a grass (unlicensed) runway designated 18/36 with a length of 506 meters (1,660 ft).

What was the role of Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome during World War II?

Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome served as an RAF station and played a crucial role as an Operational Training Unit, training aircrews from the Commonwealth and other countries.

Who operates Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome?

Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome is operated by Radarmoor Limited.

What is the significance of Avro Vulcan XM655 at Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome?

Avro Vulcan XM655 is a historic aircraft kept in taxiable condition and maintained by the 655 Maintenance & Preservation Society.

What was the history of RAF Wellesbourne Mountford?

RAF Wellesbourne Mountford was an important Class A airfield during World War II, serving as a training base for RAF Bomber Command.

What facilities and activities are available at Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome?

Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome is home to flying schools, a control tower, a market on Saturdays and Bank Holidays, and a café.

What potential threats does Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome face?

Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome is facing potential threats from developers proposing the creation of an industrial park on part of the site.

Has Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome experienced accidents and incidents?

Like any other airfield, Wellesbourne Mountford has experienced accidents and incidents, although they are rare occurrences and safety measures are in place.

Is there a museum at Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome?

Yes, the Wellesbourne Wartime Museum is located near the control tower and offers a historical perspective on the aerodrome’s wartime activities.

What fixed-base operators are based at Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome?

Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome is home to fixed-base operators such as Aeros Flight Training, Heli Air, On-Track Aviation, and South Warwickshire Flying School.

Does Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome contribute to the local community?

Yes, Wellesbourne Mountford Aerodrome organizes events such as the annual wings and wheels event and contributes to the local economy through the market held on Saturdays and Bank Holidays.

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